Leadership

The Good Ambassador

by Jeff Crawford

Lead Pastor of Ministries, Teaching Pastor, Cross Church (Springdale, AR)

I recently had the opportunity to preach from 2 Corinthians 5 as part of a teaching series we called My Mission. One phrase from one verse has had a lasting personal impact upon me and how I view my role as a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. That one verse is verse 20 and that one phrase is:

“We are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us.”

As followers of Jesus, our standing affords to us many privileges as citizens of the Kingdom of God, not the least of which is that we are joint heirs to that Kingdom with all the benefits of adoption into the Royal Family. But there are also responsibilities, namely the responsibility to serve as ambassadors for God’s Kingdom.

The role of ambassador carries with it a certain understanding, or at least it should. And that’s really the point of this post. 

Thinking about it all from a worldly geo-political point of view, let’s say that I was the United States Ambassador to Spain. That would mean that while I am a citizen of the United States, I would live in Spain.  I would also shop in Spain, drive the streets of Spain, eat the food in Spain, and I would probably even learn Spanish. But most importantly, I would build real relationships with real people in Spain.  All for a single purpose: to represent my country, the United States of America. You see, an ambassador doesn’t represent himself or herself. If I were the ambassador to Spain, it would never be about me; it would be about the United States, about the current president who appointed me, and about the government that sent me. I would be there to represent them. 

I would also be about the business of something else, something very important. In fact, the primary role of any ambassador is to deliver a message. In the same way that an ambassador represents the one who sent him or her, an ambassador also speaks for the one who does the sending. This is critical; vital, even, to the life of the mission. 

Back to our example:  if I were the ambassador to Spain, I would be very, very careful with my words. I would have a crystal-clear message from the president of the United States and it would be my job to keep that message pure. I would have talking points and I would, as they say, “stay on message.”  This means that I would not be on Twitter blowing off steam about how I felt about some restaurant in Spain that gave me poor service. To do such a thing would make the one who sent me look bad. It would also risk cutting off important relationships with Spaniards who love that restaurant. What I’m saying is that as an ambassador to Spain, it doesn’t really matter what I think about some particular topic. It doesn’t matter my viewpoint on the politics of Spain. It’s not about me. Let me say that again:  IT’S NOT ABOUT ME. It’s only about the one who sent me and about what he thinks and about what he wants me to say. I am only a mouthpiece. A messenger. My conduct and my words must be designed to reflect, in the best way possible, the one who sent me.

By now you surely know where all this is headed. Pastor, you are an ambassador of the Kingdom. You have been sent by the King to live in “Spain.” Your words and conduct out of the pulpit are actually, at times, more meaningful than what you do or say in the pulpit. I am continually shocked and disturbed by what my fellow ambassadors feel free to say in the world of Social Media. It’s as if the mantle of ambassadorship is taken off hung on the coat rack when logged on to Facebook, or Twitter, or Instagram. My fellow laborers, I appeal to you, be very careful what you say when roaming the streets of “Spain.” This is a divided world we live in.  I think it may be more divided than in anyone’s lifetime. EVERYTHING is political. It doesn’t really matter what you personally think about guns, or walls, or this president, or climate change, or you name it. Once you lay down a personal position on any of these topics and more, you have surely alienated as much as 50% of your audience before you even begin to deliver the message of the King. A good ambassador would never want to do such a thing. The message of the cross is offensive enough by itself. It doesn’t need help from you turning people off before they have a chance to hear it. Remember, it’s not about what you like or you think or you believe about this or that. It’s only about the King and the Kingdom. God is making his appeal through you. 

Live this. Preach this. Social media this. And lead your congregation to be excellent ambassadors alongside you.

Jeff Crawford, Ed.D., is the lead pastor of ministries and teaching pastor at Cross Church in Northwest Arkansas, a multi-site megachurch and one of the nation’s fastest growing churches according to Outreach magazine. Dr. Crawford is a graduate of Oklahoma Baptist University and the author of three books, the most recent of which is his debut novel, Finding Eden. He and his wife Julie (also of OBU) have two married adult children and two teenagers living at home, with their first grandson arriving in December.

Matthew Emerson
Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson, Dickinson Associate Professor of Religion, earned a bachelor’s degree from Auburn University and an M.Div. and Ph.D. in from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Emerson joined the OBU faculty in 2015. He previously taught at California Baptist University, where he served as Chair of the Arts and Sciences Department in the OPS Division. Emerson has authored or co-authored over 20 publications. His research interests include the Old Testament’s use in the New Testament, early Christian interpretation, and theological method. He serves as co-Executive Director of the Center for Baptist Renewal, co-editor of the Journal of Baptist Studies, steering committee member of the Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar, and Senior Fellow for the Center of Ancient Christian Studies. He is also a member of a number of scholarly societies. Emerson grew up in Huntsville, AL, where he met his future wife, Alicia. Married in 2006, they have five daughters. He and his wife are both members at Frontline Church in Shawnee.